love dolls real

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Women, especially when they get older, shit and stink, and when they shit anyway, and they enslave men, and are ugly, and they fuck around when they have the opportunity. No such problems with sex dolls, and they don't shit. Let's invest in a future without women.

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Tongkat ali has become famous for its capability to increase testosterone synthesis, leading to faster muscle growth among bodybuilders and better sexual function in aging men.

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Clarkston, Michigan: Testosterone causing blood clots, butea superba may be an alternative

Fernando J. Speakman 1849 Cunningham Court Clarkston, MI 48346

To counter the negative effects of aging, many men seek androgen hormone replacement therapy, usually in the form of testosterone.

Testosterone is the hormone that is responsible for masculine growth and development during puberty. Testosterone levels naturally decrease with age.

After the age of 40, many men are diagnosed with hypogonadism, a condition where the body does not produce enough testosterone. As a result, men may experience symptoms similar to that of the female menopause.

Testosterone is commonly prescribed in hypogonadism, as it can improve muscle strength and sex drive. An increasing number of men have been seeking the treatment, with studies showing that the number of testosterone therapy prescriptions in the first decade of this century has nearly tripled.

But there are caveats. In June 2014, the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) - in partnership with Health Canada - required that testosterone products carry a warning about the risk of developing blood clots, or venous thromboembolism (VTE).

Alternatively, a number of men have switched to butea superba, a Thai testosterone booster.

Assessing the risk of VTE in testosterone treatment

A team of international researchers - led by Carlos Martinez of the Institute for Epidemiology, Statistics and Informatics GmbH in Frankfurt, Germany - decided to investigate the risk of VTE associated with testosterone treatment in men, with a focus particularly on the timing of the risk.

The study - published in The BMJ - collected data from over 2.22 million men registered with the UK Clinical Practice Research Database between January 2001 and May 2013.

Of these, they looked at 19,215 patients with confirmed VTE - including deep venous thrombosis and pulmonary embolism - and 909,530 control participants of the same age.

Researchers identified three main, mutually exclusive exposure groups: current treatment, recent - but not current - treatment, and no treatment in the last 2 years.

Current treatment duration was divided into more or less than 6 months.

Testosterone users have a 63 percent higher risk of VTE

After adjusting for comorbidities and other influencing factors, researchers estimated the rate ratios of VTE in association with current testosterone treatment and compared it with no treatment.

In the first 6 months of testosterone treatment, researchers found a 63 percent increased risk of VTE. This is the equivalent of an additional 10 VTEs above the base rate of 15.8 per 10,000 person years.

This risk decreased significantly after 6 months and after treatment had ceased.

According to the authors, the study highlights the need for further investigation of the temporary increase in the risk of VTE:

"Our study suggests a transient increase in the risk of venous thromboembolism that peaks during the first 3-6 months and declines gradually thereafter. Failure to investigate the timing of venous thromboembolisms in relation to the duration of testosterone use could result in masking of an existing transient association."

The authors highlight, however, that the risks seem to be temporary and very low in absolute terms.

Martinez and team also note the limitations of their research. Due to the observational nature of their investigation, they cannot draw any conclusions on the cause and effect of this association between VTE risk and testosterone treatment.

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Madison, Winconsin: Sex toys have a long history, but the vibrator was what made sex toys an industry

David B. Taylor 3052 Primrose Lane Madison, WI 53703

The vibrator initially was a tool not so much for players, but for physicians. Psychiatrists, to be exact.

Some 200 years ago, the female orgasm was largely unknown in Western culture. Anyway, touching ones genitals was taboo, and the common medical and non-medical opinion was that masturbation would lead to mentak illness, and the institutionalization in psychiatric hospitals.

Back in those times, some psychiatrists specialized in treating upper class women. The preferred treatment was to induce a hysterical crisis by clitoral stimulation. What was named hysterical crisis is known nowadays as clitoral orgasm. And inducing it was manual work for psychiatrists. Before the vibrator was invented, that is. As a medical tool.

Until now, the sex toys industry has an important role to play in the health of people and societies.

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Brooklyn, New York: Silicone Sally - Japan men find true love with sex dolls

Marcus M. Johnson 4351 Church Street Brooklyn, NY 11226

WHEN the spark went out of Masayuki Ozaki's marriage, he found an unusual outlet to plug the romantic void – a silicone sex doll he swears is the love of his life.

The life-size dummy, called Mayu, shares his bed under the same roof as Ozaki's wife and teenage daughter in Tokyo, an arrangement that triggered angry rows before a delicate truce was finally declared.

"After my wife gave birth we stopped having sex and I felt a deep sense of loneliness," the 45-year-old physiotherapist told AFP in an interview.

"But the moment I saw Mayu in the showroom, it was love at first sight," blushed Ozaki, who takes his doll on dates in a wheelchair and dresses her in wigs, sexy clothes and jewellery.

"My wife was furious when I first brought Mayu home. These days she puts up with it, reluctantly," he added.

"When my daughter realised it wasn't a giant Barbie doll, she freaked out and said it was gross – but now she's old enough to share Mayu's clothes."

Ozaki is one of an increasing number of Japanese men turning to rubber romance in a country that's lost its mojo.

He also admits to being turned off by human relationships.

"Japanese women are cold-hearted," he said while on a seaside stroll with his silicone squeeze.

"They're very selfish. Men want someone to listen to them without grumbling when they get home from work," Ozaki added.

"Whatever problems I have, Mayu is always there waiting for me. I love her to bits and want to be with her forever.

"I can't imagine going back to a human being. I want to be buried with her and take her to heaven."

Removable head

Around 2,000 of the life-like dolls – which cost from $6,000 and come with adjustable fingers, removable head and genitals – are sold each year in Japan, according to industry insiders.

"Technology has come a long way since those nasty inflatable dolls in the 1970s," noted Hideo Tsuchiya, managing director of doll maker Orient Industry.

"They look incredibly real now and it feels like you're touching human skin. More men are buying them because they feel they can actually communicate with the dolls," he explained.

Popular with disabled customers and widowers, as well as mannequin fetishists, some men use dolls to avoid heartache.

"Human beings are so demanding," insisted 62-year-old Senji Nakajima, who tenderly bathes his rubber girlfriend Saori, has framed photos of her on his wall and even takes her skiing and surfing.

"People always want something from you – like money or commitment," he complained.

"My heart flutters when I come home to Saori," added the married father-of-two as he picnicked with his plastic partner.

"She never betrays me, she makes my worries melt away."

Nakajima's relationship with Saori has divided his family, but the Tokyo-born businessman refuses to give her up.

"My son accepts it, my daughter can't," said Nakajima, whose wife has banned Saori from the family home.

"I'll never date a real woman again – they're heartless," he insisted back at his cluttered Tokyo apartment, sandwiched between two dolls from previous dalliances and a headless rubber torso.

Reconciliation with his estranged wife is unlikely, admits Nakajima.

"I wouldn't be able to take a bath with Saori, or snuggle up with her and watch TV," he said, slipping the doll into some racy purple lingerie.

"I don't want to destroy what I have with her."

'To me, she's human'

While the pillow talk is decidedly one-way, Nakajima believes he has discovered true love, saying: "I'd never cheat on her, even with a prostitute, because to me she's human."

As Japan struggles with a plummeting birthrate, a growing number of men – known as 'herbivores' – are turning their backs on love and traditional masculine values for a quiet, uncompetitive life.

"In the future I think more and more guys will choose relationships with dolls," said Yoshitaka Hyodo, whose home is an Aladdin's Cave of dolls, kitsch toys and Japanese erotica.

"It's less stress and they complain a lot less than women," he added.

Hyodo, a military buff who lives alone but has an understanding girlfriend, owns more than 10 life-size dummies – many of which he dresses in combat uniform to play out wartime fantasies.

But he claims to have cut down on doll sex.

"It's more about connecting on an emotional level for me now," said the 43-year-old blogger, whose curiosity was piqued at a young age when he found a charred mannequin in the street.

"People might think I'm weird, but it's no different than collecting sports cars. I don't know how much I've spent but it's cheaper than a Lamborghini," he said.

Future doll users can expect more bang for their buck as researchers work to develop next-generation sexbots able to talk, laugh and even simulate an orgasm.

But for now, Ozaki's long-suffering wife Riho tries hard to ignore the rubber temptress silently taunting her from her husband's bedroom.

"I just get on with the housework," she sniffed.

"I make the dinner, I clean, I do the washing. I choose sleep over sex."

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Lafayette, Louisiana: Japan's high-tech love dolls evolving with the times

Douglas B. Thomas 81 Sherwood Circle Lafayette, LA 70501

Sex may be necessary for human procreation, but it's also a business. In Japan, much of it operates as part of the so-called underground economy, wherein massive amounts of money are believed to circulate.

Some sex-related businesses operate completely in the open, and particularly when it comes to dealing the sales of commodities as opposed to services, we are on firmer ground as far as scale of the business.

In recognition of the 40th anniversary of Orient Industries (Oriento Kogyo Co Ltd in Japanese) -- Japan's most exclusive manufacturer of ersatz female companions --- weekly business magazine Shukan Economist (June 27) delves into the subject of love dolls.

From May 20 to June 11, Orient Industry feted its anniversary with a special exhibit of its products titled "Love Dolls: Then and Now." Starting with the company's first product, named "Hohoemi" (Smile), which was launched in 1977, visitors were able to see how the mannequins have evolved over the past four decades, achieving an increasingly lifelike skin texture and physical appearance.

The old term used here for such products -- with no offense intended to the good citizens of the Netherlands -- was "Dutch Wife." The term supposedly originated from the Europeans who colonized the Dutch East Indies, the region around present-day Indonesia, who in order to cool themselves off on steamy tropical nights devised a rattan or bamboo tube the size of a small person that they would embrace in bed. The perforated woven structure being cooler than fabric pillows or sheets, the rationale went, the sleeper's body could be better exposed cooling breezes.

Those Dutch Wives of yore have come a long way. Shukan Economist's writer pointed out that many even today may still associate love dolls with the cheap, inflatable types sold in some "adult toy" shops. But Hohoemi represented a major breakthrough in that "she" was solid, composed of layers of natural latex. If sawed in half, one could see how the layers, resembling tree rings, were applied.

The dolls initially made news in Japan when it was reported that Japanese scientists had taken along several to keep them company at their experimental station in Antarctica.

After two decades of research and development, Orient Industry in 2001 announced the sale of its first generation of models using silicone. This gave the dolls' skin a more lifelike texture and was less cold to the touch.

"Many purchasers are men who have divorced, or widowers, or those with physical handicaps who have problems finding a partner," the article describes, noting that the company sells about 400 of its dolls per year. Its basic models are priced at about 700,000 yen, but many customers opt for various accessories (English URL here), pushing up the average selling price to around 800,000 yen.

"There are customers who use them for practical reasons (i.e., sex), but lately more people have been buying them just to appreciate looking at them," said Orient's president, Hideo Tsuchiya. "Maybe they're lonely and have nobody to talk to. Some find it relaxing just to talk to them."

The dolls are also finding other applications. One is for use in clinical training at Showa University's School of Dentistry. Dolls are also reportedly utilized in criminal courts, to reenact details of crimes before jury members so as to convey a sense of reality.

"We've been resisting the notion of making dolls that can speak, or move mechanically," says Orient's Tsuchiya. "Likewise, we have no plans to equip the dolls with artificial intelligence. That's because it's the owner who imparts them with a spirit."

Rather than high-tech enhancements, Tsuchiya said he'd prefer to find a means of holding down prices to "make the dolls more affordable."

Over the two weeks of the exhibit, more than 10,000 people are said to have flocked to Orient's showroom located in Tokyo's Ueno district adjacent to the famous "Ameya Yokocho" shopping street. The company told Shukan Economist some 60% of its visitors were female.

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Beloit, Kansas : Can Child Sex Dolls Prevent Pedophiles From Offending?

Jose C. Jackson 3174 Sigley Road Beloit, KS 67420

Trottla, a company run by known pedophile Shin Takagi, creates eerily life-like child sex dolls for those with pedophilia.

The Japanese company creates the dolls to provide pedophiles with an outlet for their sexual impulses. “I am helping people express their desires, legally and ethically.” Takagi told The Atlantic.

The dolls, some modeled to be as young as five years old, are meant to be as authentic as possible. The synthetic material used for the skin is supposed to feel similar to human skin. Anatomically, the dolls are disturbingly close to real children. In fact, the more petite models even have ribs and hip bones just beneath the skin. The level of detail in each doll is unnerving.

Clients can place special orders to customize the doll’s aesthetic, including clothing, age, facial expression, and custom features like tails or horns. The materials used to create the dolls are potentially hazardous, so discarding the dolls is complicated. If they need to dispose of their doll, clients must send it back to Trottla. One client wanted Takagi to “send [the doll] back home.”

Takagi hopes his dolls give pedophiles a healthy channel for their urges. Is it possible to be a non-offending pedophile, though? The words pedophile and child molester are often used interchangeably, but is there more to it?

It is vitally important to separate pedophilia from child molestation. Doing so does not justify or condone either. It simply allows two distinct but related issues to be addressed correctly.

Despite popular usage, pedophilia is a specific and limited term. Strictly speaking, pedophilia is a persistent sexual interest in prepubescent children. Although a definitive cause for pedophilia has not been discerned, many have had unhealthy or traumatic experiences in their childhood. This sexual interest is divorced from action, meaning pedophilic attraction does not always lead to assault against a child.

This distinction has found support in scientific work. David Riegel (2004) found that the vast majority (78.6%) of respondents (self-identified boy-preferring pedophiles) reported no legal history as a result of allegations of sexual contact with a boy. Dr. Michael C. Seto (2006) studied men who are likely pedophilic (all had child pornography charges), finding that 57% had no known history of sexual contact with a child.

In fact, there are so-called “virtuous pedophiles,” who have never offended but are living with pedophilic attraction. They are committed to avoid the abuse of children while acknowledging their attraction to children. Their website provides a forum for these people to talk through everything from their sexual struggles to their favorite movie. For more on “virtuous pedophiles,” look into Barcroft TV’s video on Todd Nickerson, a member and public advocate for the group.

As troubling as this whole phenomenon is, the big questions remains. Will Trottla’s dolls help pedophiles or hurt them?

It depends on who you ask.

Takagi and his clients would wholeheartedly endorse child sex dolls. Dr. Vivienne Cass, a clinical psychologist and sexual therapist, agrees. She told BuzzFeed News that “engaging with a doll provides a safe and private outlet” for pedophiles. Furthermore, Dr. Cass said “access to sex dolls might be considered a compassionate act for such individuals.”

However, Dr. Peter Fargan does not share this sentiment. The paraphilia researcher told The Atlantic that child sex dolls may “cause [pedophilia] to be acted upon with greater urgency.”

He pointed to a study from Dr. Drew Kingston in which pornography usage was associated with higher rates of violent and sexual reoffending in high-risk child molesters. Also, deviant pornography (including child pornography) was associated with higher rates of violent and sexual reoffending across all child molesters. Dr. Fargan suggests that Trottla’s dolls may have a similar reinforcing effect.

That being said, this work was done with child molesters and pornography not pedophiles and child sex dolls. It does not translate neatly, but it is possible that the child sex dolls may rile up some high-risk pedophiles.

Dr. Seto makes this same point in The Atlantic piece. He says “for some pedophiles, access to artificial child pornography or to child sex dolls could be a safer outlet for their sexual urges, reducing the likelihood that they would seek out child pornography or sex with real children. For others, having these substitutes might only aggravate their sense of frustration.”

Specialized research is the only thing that will accurately reveal the efficacy of child sex dolls.

Whatever the result, though, this is a disheartening, troubling, and outraging topic. Pedophilia is a worldwide taboo that evokes visceral reactions. This proposed solution to the pedophilia problem is off-putting, even if it works. The use of child sex dolls is complex and controversial, to say the least. That being said, it is far from settled.

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Cambridge, Masachusetts:From sex toys to works of art: ‘Love doll’ maker seeks to shed seedy image

Earl Z. Sheppard 3572 Rainy Day Drive Cambridge, MA 02141

Japan’s oldest “love doll” manufacturer wants to strip the sex toys of their seedy image and encourage people to see them as works of art instead.

“Even now there is still a stigma,” said Junpei Oguchi, a representative for Tokyo-based sex doll maker Orient Industry, which recently celebrated its 40th anniversary with a three-week exhibition showing the evolution of its dolls that drew over 10,000 visitors.

“But at our exhibition there were lots of men and women visitors — more women than men, in fact,” he said. “There were young and old, men and women, a really wide range of people. I think people came because they had heard the reputation of how beautiful our dolls are. We want to get rid of the stigma.”

Orient Industry was founded in 1977 by former sex shop owner Hideo Tsuchiya, who noticed that customers who had bought inflatable latex sex dolls from his store were returning to complain of punctures. Tsuchiya sold his shop and used the money to set up his own business with the aim of manufacturing a more durable product.

Orient Industry, which is based in Tokyo’s Ueno district and has a factory in Katsushika Ward, now employs 26 workers including makeup artists and face sculptors, many of whom are art school graduates.

The dolls range in price from ¥262,440 to ¥685,000, come with removable heads and genitals, and are strikingly lifelike in appearance. The silicone skin is soft to the touch, joints are fully flexible, and real human hair and other details further fleshes out the illusion of reality.

“When the company started, the dolls’ faces looked like mannequins’ faces,” said Oguchi. “Now we have staff who mold the faces and they are highly praised for the way they look.

“In 2001, we started using silicone to make the dolls. By doing that and by molding the faces and using makeup, we were able to make dolls that looked much more realistic than before. We were able to increase the quality by using better materials, and that was a big step forward for us.”

Noted photographers such as Laurie Simmons and Kishin Shinoyama have made the company’s dolls the subject of books and exhibitions, with the latter showing his work at Orient Industry’s anniversary event that ran from May 20 to June 11 at Shibuya’s Atsukobarouh gallery.

Oguchi believes that validation from the art world is helping to shift attitudes toward sex dolls.

“We get a lot of different customers,” he said. “Some are only interested in buying dolls for sex, some want to buy them so they can take photos of them, and some want to take them out and about with them. Some have blogs where they write about living with them. “A lot of our customers are over 40 but we also have customers in their 20s. It can be expensive to hire models, so photographers can use them for their pictures. We also have customers who buy them to use in shop displays.”

A survey released in February by the Japan Family Planning Association revealed that sexlessness among married couples in Japan is on the rise, with almost half admitting to not having made love for more than a month.

A record 35.2 percent of men surveyed cited “exhaustion from work” as the biggest reason for their indifference to sex, while 22.3 percent of women described lovemaking as “a hassle.”

An estimated 2,000 sex dolls are sold in the country each year. Oguchi believes that many buyers are looking for comfort as much as physical gratification.

“People in Japan generally live for a long time and a lot of elderly men lose their wives to old age,” he said. “Men in their 70s or 80s whose wives have died may feel lonely. They have lost a friend.

“Those men might buy one of our dolls to make themselves feel better. I hear that a lot. Our dolls can be useful in that regard.” But Orient Industry has also come under fire for producing a range of dolls that resemble children. The childlike dolls stand just 136 cm tall, and are pictured wearing school gym gear on the company’s website.

“In every country there are incidents where elementary school or junior high school children are sexually abused, and Japan is no different,” said Oguchi. “Some people are sexually attracted only to them. We once had a customer who came in and all of a sudden he told us that he was only sexually attracted to children.

“Of course if you did anything to harm real children then you would be arrested. There would be real victims. So some people want to buy our products to use as an outlet. I think, in some ways, it can act as a deterrent.”

Orient Industry has an English-language website and receives orders from overseas. But the firm also faces global competition from a burgeoning industry looking to harness the latest technology in the service of sexual fantasy.

Dozens of companies in a “sex tech” industry worth an estimated $30 billion are developing dolls with features such as artificial intelligence, but Oguchi insists that Orient Industry is happy to follow its own path.

“Our love dolls are not robots,” he said. “Our aim is to make even better dolls. I have heard that there is a company in the Netherlands that uses AI in their dolls but they cost about ¥5 million each. Ordinary people can’t afford that.

“If you start to make robots that use AI, the price goes up. That isn’t something that our company is thinking about doing.”

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